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Inaugural Jacobs Trauma Lecture Pays Tribute to Legendary Surgeon and Highlights Groundbreaking Research

September 16, 2022

A visionary and pioneer in trauma care are how colleagues described Lenworth M. Jacobs, MD, MPH, FACS, during the inaugural lecture named in honor of the world-renowned Hartford Hospital trauma surgeon and educator.

Honoring Lenworth Jacobs, MD from Hartford HealthCare on Vimeo. More than 300 physicians, advanced practice providers, RNs, respiratory therapists, and others who care for emergency and trauma patients from around the world attended virtually and another 50, including Dr. Jacobs, came to the socially distanced event in person at the Bone & Joint Institute’s Beverly Buckner Baker Auditorium on Thursday, Sept. 15. Before the lecture “Research that Has Transformed Trauma Care,” delivered by Raul Coimbra, MD, PhD, FACS, professor of surgery at Loma Linda University School of Medicine, colleagues paid tribute to Dr. Jacobs for his role in advancing trauma care, trauma education and coordination of pre-hospital care — some standards of which have been adopted nationwide. Hartford HealthCare President and CEO Jeffrey Flaks also recognized Dr. Jacobs for his commitment to health equity. “You have always been the greatest advocate of the poor and vulnerable,” said Flaks. “At this institution, at every table you sat, you continued to remind us and bring attention to our mission and purpose of the importance of not leaving any person or community behind.” Dr. Jacobs, known as a trailblazer in trauma and pre-hospital care helped establish the LIFE STAR program and was instrumental in Hartford Hospital becoming a Level I Trauma Center in the 1980s. Among many other accomplishments, Dr. Jacobs established the Advanced Trauma Operative Management (ATOM) Course, an educational component of the American College of Surgeons; and is the creator of the Stop-The-Bleed campaign, an educational program of the American College of Surgeons now being adopted nationwide to empower people to help one another during an active shooter situation. Hartford Hospital President Bimal Patel credited Dr. Jacobs for his visionary and inspirational leadership. “Len, you are the Babe Ruth and Derek Jeter of trauma care and you helped make Hartford Hospital Yankee Stadium,” Patel said. Jacobs, who became tearful during a six-minute video which included tributes from colleagues from across the country, said one of the keys to success is collaboration. “One of the most important tricks I’ve learned over the years is to talk to people, use their wisdom, find a really important problem and come up with a solution [together],” said Dr. Jacobs. Following the tribute, Dr. Coimbra presented a 60-minute lecture highlighting research studies that have helped improve trauma care in areas such as damage control surgery and resuscitation. The event was hosted by William Sardella, MD, chief of surgery, Hartford Hospital. It also included a panel discussion led by Matthew Lissauer, chief, division of acute care surgery and case presentations moderated by Jonathan Gates, MD, chief, division of acute care surgery, Hartford Hospital.